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Difference between woods used at Woodpentry and the Competitors

Posted by Woodpentry 11/10/2017 0 Comment(s)

ALL ABOUT EXOTIC SOLID HARDWOODS : TEAK, OAK, PADUL AND SAPPELI.

 

 

The more one knows about the unique characteristics of wood and its source, the better one can understand the degree of warmth and beauty that it brings to our everyday décor. Furniture made of wood is one of the few things in the world that all people can own and know that they are the only person in the world who owns that grain pattern and its inherent beauty. Each grain pattern is a unique masterpiece of design, texture and splendour. Even what some may view as a defect, like a knot or other natural blemishes, in effect add beauty and character to the furniture.

 

Solid, good quality wooden furniture is not easily found today, and if it is, the cost is immense since we need to try not cut down trees for furniture, but value its purpose in nature. The furniture that is still made from wood these days might be stunning and of high value, but could cause you a few raised eye brows.

 

The fact is that there really is a wide variety of very old and antique stunning furniture out there, and they are fast becoming very highly sought after. Wooden furniture is a matter of taste, some people just love it, while others will not be that appreciative.

 

THE GRAIN

 

The beauty of the wood is determined by its grain, i.e. the pattern formed as the tree grows and forms rings. Each year the tree forms a new ring.

 

The grain of the wood is most important in the identification of woods. The grain gives the wood a fine or coarse texture which gives the wood character and beauty.

 

THE CUT

 

The way the wood gets sawed makes all the difference to how the finished product will turn out. The grain of the wood will have a varied appearance if cut differently.

 

We’ve put together this handy guide to help you choose which type of wood is right for your furniture. With our guide we’ll give you the low down on some of the most popular wood types available and explain their different characteristics as well as the differences

 

THE SIZE

 

The size and girth of the tree is determined by the number years it has sustained in nature. The more number of years a tree sustains the more girth it attains and the girth determines the quantity and quality of the heartwood, which is used predominantly for the carcasses of furniture’s.

 

WOODS USED AT WOODPENTRY

 

1. AFRICAN PADUK:

  • Common Name(s): African Padauk, Vermillion
  • Scientific Name: Pterocarpus soyauxii
  • Tree Size: 100-130 ft (30-40 m) tall, 2-4 ft (.6-1.2 m) trunk diameter

  1. Colour/Appearance: Heartwood colour can vary, ranging from a pale pinkish orange to a deep brownish red. Most pieces tend to start reddish orange when freshly cut, darkening substantially over time to a reddish/purplish brown.
  2. Grain/Texture: Grain is usually straight, but can sometimes be interlocked. With a coarse, open texture and good natural lustre.
  3. Rot Resistance: Has excellent decay resistance, and is rated as durable to very durable. Padauk is also reported to be resistant to termites and other insects.
  4. Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  5. Common Uses: Veneer, flooring, turned objects, musical instruments, furniture, tool handles, and other small specialty wood objects.

 

2. SAPELE / SAPELLI / SAPELI:

  • Common Name(s): Sapele, Sapelli, Sapeli
  • Scientific Name: Entandrophragma cylindricum
  • Tree Size: 100-150 ft (30-45 m) tall, 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m) trunk diameter

  1. Colour / Appearance: Heartwood is a golden to dark reddish brown. Colour tends to darken with age. Besides the common ribbon pattern seen on quarter sawn boards, Sapele is also known for a wide variety of other figured grain patterns, such as: pommele, quilted, mottled, wavy, beeswing, and fiddle back.
  2. Grain / Texture: Grain is interlocked, and sometimes wavy. Fine uniform texture and good natural lustre.
  3. Rot Resistance: Heartwood ranges from moderately durable to very durable regarding decay resistance. Moderate insect/borer resistance.
  4. Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices, but is on the IUCN Red List.
  5. Common Uses: Veneer, plywood, furniture, cabinetry, flooring, boatbuilding, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small wooden specialty items.

 

3. TEAK:

  • Common Name(s): Teak
  • Scientific Name: Tectona grandis
  • Tree Size: 100-130 ft (30-40 m) tall, 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m) trunk diameter

  1. Colour / Appearance: Heartwood tends to be a golden or medium brown, with colour darkening with age.
  2. Grain / Texture: Grain is straight, though it can occasionally be wavy or interlocked. Coarse, uneven texture and moderate lustre. Raw, unfinished wood surfaces have a slightly oily or greasy feel due to natural oils
  3. Rot Resistance: Teak has been considered by many to be the gold standard for decay resistance, and its heartwood is rated as very durable. Teak is also resistant to termites, though it is only moderately resistant to marine borers and powder post beetles.
  4. Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  5. Common Uses: Ship and boatbuilding, veneer, furniture, exterior construction, carving, turnings, and other small wood objects.

 

4. WHITE OAK:

  • Common Name(s): White Oak
  • Scientific Name: Quercus alba
  • Tree Size: 65-85 ft (20-25 m) tall, 3-4 ft (1-1.2 m) trunk diameter

  1. Colour / Appearance: Heartwood is a light to medium brown, commonly with an olive cast. Nearly white to light brown sapwood is not always sharply demarcated from the heartwood. Quarter sawn sections display prominent ray fleck patterns.
  2. Grain / Texture: Grain is straight, with a coarse, uneven texture.
  3. Rot Resistance: Rated as very durable; frequently used in boatbuilding and tight cooperage applications.
  4. Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  5. Common Uses: Cabinetry, furniture, interior trim, flooring, boatbuilding, barrels, and veneer.
     

WOODS USED BY COUNTERPARTS IN MARKET

 

1. SISSOO / SHEESHAM:

  • Common Name(s): Sissoo, Sheesham
  • Scientific Name: Dalbergia sissoo
  • Tree Size: 35-65 ft (10-20 m) tall, 2-3 ft (.6-1 m) trunk diameter (Why we do not use Sheesham Wood)

  1. Colour / Appearance: Heartwood ranges from golden brown to a darker reddish brown. The pale, straw-coloured sapwood is clearly demarcated from the heartwood, and is sometimes incorporated into finished products—possibly for reasons of economy rather than aesthetics. (Why we do not use Sheesham Wood).
  2. Grain / Texture: Sheesham generally has a straight grain, though it can be interlocked — sometimes severely so. Texture is medium to coarse with a good natural lustre.
  3. Rot Resistance: Sheesham has good decay resistance and is rated as durable to very durable.
  4. Sustainability: Although Sheesham is not evaluated on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, it is listed on CITES appendix II under the genus-wide restriction on all Dalbergia species—which also includes finished products made of the wood. (Why we do not use Sheesham Wood).
  5. Common Uses: Veneer, fuel wood, plywood, musical instruments (percussion), furniture, flooring, boatbuilding, carving, and turned objects.

 

2. MANGO WOOD:

  • Common Name(s): Mango, Hawaiian Mango
  • Scientific Name: Mangifera indica
  • Tree Size: 80-100 ft (24-30 m) tall, 3-4 ft (1-1.2 m) trunk diameter

  1. Colour / Appearance: Because of the spalting that is commonly present, the wood can be a kaleidoscope of colours. Under normal circumstances, heartwood is a golden brown, while other colours such as yellow and streaks of pink and/or black can also occur. Paler sapwood is not always clearly defined. Curly or mottled grain patterns are also common.
  2. Grain / Texture: Grain can be straight or interlocked. With a medium to coarse texture and good natural lustre.
  3. Rot Resistance: Mango is rated anywhere from moderately durable to perishable. However, Mango is also susceptible to both fungal and insect attack. (Why we do not use Mango Wood).
  4. Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices, but is reported by the IUCN as being data deficient. It was formerly listed on the Red List as vulnerable. (Why we do not use Mango Wood).
  5. Common Uses: Furniture, ukuleles, veneer, plywood, turned objects, and flooring
     

 

3. RUBBER WOOD:

  • Common Name(s): Rubber wood, Plantation Hardwood
  • Scientific Name: Hevea brasiliensis
  • Tree Size: 75-100 ft (23-30 m) tall, 1-3 ft (.3-1 m) trunk diameter

  1. Colour / Appearance: Heartwood naturally a light blonde to medium tan colour, sometimes with medium brown streaks. Sapwood not distinct from heartwood. Colour tends to darken slightly with age. Frequently coloured or stained when used in furniture construction.
  2. Grain / Texture: Grain is straight, with a somewhat coarse, open texture. Low natural lustre.
  3. Rot Resistance: Rubberwood is perishable, and has very little natural resistance to decay. It is also susceptible to fungal staining and insect attacks. (Why we do not use Rubber Wood).
  4. Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Rubberwood lumber is typically taken from rubber plantations where the trees are tapped for latex, and harvested at the end of their useful life cycle—typically after about thirty years. (Why we do not use Rubber Wood).
  5. Common Uses: Furniture, cabinetry, interior millwork, kitchen woodenware (cutting boards, knife blocks, etc.), and other small, specialty wood items.
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